Beginning this Thursday, July 8, Galerie Quynh will present The Complex of the Glass Frog – an exhibition of new work by Sandrine Llouquet. Llouquet’s third solo exhibition at the gallery will feature ambitious installation-based work derived from her drawing practice. The large-scale works are inspired by the more formal elements of line and color that define her minimal drawings of curiously winsome and violent subjects.

For this exhibition, Llouquet eschews her usual paper support and takes her drawings into three dimensions. Klee described drawing as taking a line for a walk; Llouquet’s lines become active subjects following an intuitive journey that twists, winds and entangles.

Of Vietnamese descent, Sandrine Llouquet was born in 1975 in Montpellier, France. She graduated from École Pilote Internationale d’Art et de Recherche – Villa Arson following a years’ study at the Ho Chi Minh City University of Fine Art. She has spent the last five years living and working in Ho Chi Minh City. An active contributor to the development of the art scene in Vietnam, she is co-founder of Wonderful District, a project that promotes contemporary art through exhibitions, concerts and theater pieces, as well as a member of Mogas Station, a Vietnam-based artist collective. Llouquet’s work has been exhibited in numerous venues including the Palais de Tokyo, Yerba Buena Center for the Arts and most recently at the Tate Modern (presented by San Art in No Soul for Sale). She has also participated in a number of biennales with Mogas Station such as the Shenzhen Biennale (2007), the Singapore Biennale (2006) and in Migration Addicts – a collateral event of the 52nd Venice Biennale.

Opening reception: Thursday, July 8 from 6 – 8pm

Exhibition dates: July 9 – August 21, 2010

Location: Galerie Quynh, 65 De Tham Street, District 1, HCMC, Vietnam

Gallery hours: Tuesday – Saturday: 10am – 6pm, Closed on Sundays and Mondays

Contact information: Thu Vu (English); Huynh Kim Yen (Vietnamese), info@galeriequynh.com, +84 (8) 3836 8019

This month, AsiaLIFE examines the lives of eight expatriates from around the globe in our first People Issue. Hailing from Ghana, Israel, France, Kyrgyzstan, the Philippines, Australia, South Korea and the United States, these individuals have made Vietnam home for many different reasons, but they all live a life less ordinary. Taken together, their stories reveal something more about modern-day Vietnam and the opportunities it holds for the enterprising and adventurous.

Also this month: Hiphop legend DJ Premier in the Q&A seat. Dave Lemke brings us on a photographic tour of the streets of Havana. Beth Young wonders whether Bui Vien is growing up in Street Smart. Jeremy Kressmann immerses himself in Myanmar’s colonial past. Jade Bilowol travels to a Central Highlands village where women rule the roost. Alexandra Karina gives us the skinny on the sticky Vietnamese staple xoi. Krista Lambie learns how individuals afflicted with leprosy overcome stigma in Vietnam. Thomas Maresca heads to Mui Ne to attend a triathlon rooted in environmental and social responsibility. Brett Davis profiles a new social networking site that’s uniting the Vietnamese diaspora in the digital domain. And Jade Bilowol visits perhaps the coolest office in Saigon (and revs up a Segway).